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A Lesson by Khatoon Hazara
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THIS TOOK SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO LONG TO WRITE AND FORMAT, PLEASE DON'T LET IT BE MADE IN VAIN

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To be able to write with a pen down on paper like the way liquid spills onto the smooth marble setting; fluidly and in control at the same time is not that hard to do when you have the proper utensils. That is: your brain, a pen, paper or the computer/laptop/device that you’re using. But the required mental thinking to do so may not be at all satisfying.

1.      Your Brain

o   Your brain is an essential part of this task as it will be used to generate the “liquid” or “fluid” which is going to be the words of your poem.

2.      The Idea

o   It is highly recommended you sit on this one like a chicken on her egg; that is, pace yourself as much as you please and be sure to have a nice chat with yourself (that’s what I do).

3.      The Thread

o   Consciously and verbally saying out the structure of your poem helps too. Just be sure to make sense of what you’re writing, if you wish to intentionally scramble your words, be sure to indicate this intention first as it will take a toll on the readers’ mind.

o   Make sure you’re using logic if it’s realistic, if not, disregard this.

4.      Mental Preparation

o   If you’ve done these steps correctly, your product as of now should be a detailed idea about how you want your poem to sound.

o    If you have any loose strands, stranded ideas, nonsensical words or any related categorized ramblings, it’s totally fine. Remember, this isn’t the final product.

5.      Before The Publication (Questions You Should Ask Yourself Prior To Publication)

                                                       I.            Does everything sound as it should?

§  Make sure to really set this right, if you don’t, you’ll regret it. If the answer to this question is yes; move on, if not; keep reading.

v      If your answer was no, then you must go back and re-read the bits you’ve written. Make sure they fit together, if not, try and sound it out in your head, it’s ok to go back, it’s totally alright if you need to take more time.

                                                    II.            Do all the parts of my poem agree with each other?

§  This includes verb agreement, comma placement, word usage, sentence fragments, run-ons’; don’t let these intimidate you. If you have no idea what these are; keep reading, if so; move on.

v      Verb Agreement- Ex: “my dog run after the ice cream after my dad rush into the house”

v  The two verbs run and rush are both used incorrectly, therefore, those verbs don’t agree. In order for them to agree you’d have to put “ran” and “rushed”.

v  Like putting jigsaw pieces together, you have to use the right ‘action’ word with the right ‘time’ word or vice versa.

v      Comma Placement- Take a look at this sentence: “When Connie gave me her ring a few days later I lost it.”

v  Does this sentence make any sense? If not, then maybe commas may be of use here. The comma should be placed between ‘ring’ and ‘a’, and again after ‘later’ and ‘I’.

v  Comas usually go after sentence with breaks or pauses; it tells you when to take a breath, usually when something is about to happen but that something is conjoined into the sentence.

v      Word Usage- Word usage is the formation and order of words in which you them in sentences.

v      Sentence Fragments- A fragment is an unfinished something. So a sentence fragment is an unfinished thought or sentence.

v  Ex- Owls have a natural tendency to hunt for mice at night; this is important if you want to keep one as a pet.

     Well, this may sound right but something is wrong, catch it? “This is important if…” what is important? You have to clearly express what you mean so others won’t confuse it for something else.

v      Run-Ons- These types of sentences are common. Sentences that should have a comma; don’t. sentences that should  have a period often tend to bleed in with another

                                                 III.            Am I happy with my work?

§  This should be easy to answer.

6.            Publication

 

 

                                                                                                                               



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Author

Khatoon Hazara
Khatoon Hazara

NYC, NY



About
Born the the city of Bronx, NY, Khatoon Koli Hazara is a devoted poet, sometimes artist and full-time sister. She plays Minecraft on the XBox360, Yu-Ghi-Oh! with her 3 siblings and helps out in the ki..