Project Horror Writer's Review : Forum : No Subject


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Are you exclusive?

11 Years Ago


I was just wondering . . . how many of you consider yourselves to be exclusively horror writers?  Do you ever experiment in other genres or is horror the be all, end all for you?  Obviously since you are members of this group, horror and the macabre hold a special place in your hearts . . . but I am also curious as to what initially drew you to creating works of the darker variety?

Personally, horror is simply one of the mediums I write in.  I also play around with science fiction, cyberpunk, and more "literary" works that don't really fit into a genre or category.  However, horror seems to be the category that I return to most and often horror elements tinge my other works as well.  As long as I can remember I have been drawn to things of a darker nature.  As a child I was obessed with vampires, werewolves, and monsters.  I used to buy copies of Fangoria and hang the posters all over my bedroom, much to my mother's chagrin.  At one point, she actually pulled them all off the wall and she she was going to put them away so that when I grew up I could see what a sick and twisted little boy I was.  LOL.  I guess she's still waiting . . .  So, of course, once I discovered the joy of writing it was only natural for my plots to turn to my beloved creatures of the night and the shambling hordes of undead who graced my tv every Saturday on the Midnight Creature Feature.
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[no subject]

11 Years Ago


I don't just write horror, but horror is where I always seem to finish.  I have tried to poems and stories of other genres, but the creatures of the night always crawl in and over take the piece.  Now and then I do succeed in writing something other than horror, including a little comedy now and then, but it is always a comedy of a dark nature.  It's funny that I was the opposite of you when I was a child.  I never really went in for the dark and dirty side of the world, having enough of that in my own life.  But as I grew older and experimented more and more, it was the horror genre that I fell into.  My first experience was reading The Shrine by James Herbert, after that I was hooked.  I read more and more horror, obviously turning to Stephen King and Dean Koontz, though I do find Koontz a little predictable, as is some of james Herbert's work.  I guess I love the surprise and the adreninlin rush that the horrror sometimes gives, if done right.