Size Matters

Size Matters

A Story by Tea And A Cheshire Smile
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An article on how clothing is sized unfairly

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  When is a size 12 not a size 12? When it’s hanging on a fashion rail. With clothing sizes getting smaller and smaller as the years go by, I can guarantee that if you were to go into three different stores, you’d be a different size in each of them. But just when did a size 10 stop being a size 10? Simple; when the fashion world decided that all teenage girls should be flat chest-ed and stick thin. 

  In a world where appearance is all that matters, a girl can be reduced to tears when she finds herself barely able to squeeze into a pair of size 14 jeans " despite the fact that she’s really a size 8. In fact, this is exactly what’s happening across the country; teenagers are going shopping and finding that although they may be one size in, say, Pineapple, that same size is far too small for them in Jane Norman.

  The size 12 of today is the size 6 of yesterday, and it seems that this is one of the many reasons for teenage girls starving themselves. With role models such as Victoria Beckham, girls are feeling more and more under pressure to gain the “ideal figure”, and clothing labels are only increasing that pressure with their unfair sizing. By the time girls have achieved the size they want, that size has become the new size 18, and it’s because of this that girls turn to starving themselves or harming their bodies in other ways.

  Anorexia and Bulimia are two of the leading causes for teenage girls ending up in hospital " more girls have ended up in hospital due to starving themselves, than they have due to alcohol or drugs " but, despite this, there’s been no law put into place about clothing sizes. The EU have the power to change this, however, they clearly don’t see it as enough of a problem to pass a law regarding clothing sizes. In the past, they’ve put laws into place that restrict how large a banana must be before it can be sold in a supermarket, and yet they still haven’t found a good enough reason to ensure that sizes are regulated across the market. 

  Also, I think it’s safe to assume that the fashion designers have noticed the effect their sizing is having on the teenage girls of today, so why do they continue to make their clothing so ridiculously small? Because it costs less, of course. With money becoming a bigger and bigger issue, more labels are turning to sweat shops in order to sell their clothing at cheaper prices. Sweat shops are used by designers because they’re a quick, cheap way to get their clothes manufactured, and one of the reasons these sweat shops are so cheap is because they use the smallest amount of material possible. Although sweat shops are no longer as big a problem, most designers have used them at some point, and this is one of the reasons that sizing is still so small.

  Between sweat shops and anorexic teens, the chances are that so long as the sizing stays as small as it is, someone somewhere is going to be hurting. If we’re ever going to change this size-obsessed society, we need a law put in place as soon as possible that will ensure that a size 12 is the same across the board. With such a law in place, the way many teenage girls think will change " they may even choose normal sized celebrities as role models as opposed to stars such as Posh Spice.

  True, many experts are worried about the rising numbers of obese teens; however, as many others have pointed out, just as many teenagers are starving themselves. "You wouldn’t believe the number of perfectly thin teenagers I've talked to who are worried about their weight simply because they were a size 14 in Jane Norman. A law like that would help so many teenagers across Britain and is far more necessary than most would think," said child psychologist Wendy Burton, when asked for her views on such a law. "In my opinion, there need to be stricter laws put into place, or thousands more teens will suffer."

  Over the years, clothing has been getting smaller and smaller, and, without a law put into place, girls across the country will suffer. How long until girls  are starving themselves to the point where their bodies become emaciated? How long until girls as young as 6 years old are taught that bones are the new black? Where will it end?


 

© 2010 Tea And A Cheshire Smile


Author's Note

Tea And A Cheshire Smile
Another school project from year 8 ^^ This time I was working with a word limit, so it's not as good as I would've liked, but hey. I didn't change anything from the original essay, so there's bound to be quite a few errors "/ still, I want your honest opinion :)

I got my mark back ^^ 27/27 ._. which I'm rather pleased with. I wouldn't have personally marked it as high but I'm certainly not complaining!

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Featured Review

I enjoyed your tone throughout this piece. It is refreshing to hear a young person speak with a clear point of view and not the typical mindless drivel that permeates much of the culture of youth. I applaud you on your depth of research and your sensitive and serious handling of a very real problem. I'm not at all certain I agree with the government forcing more laws upon us, I think we the public could handle this with our wallets and our voices, but I digress. Again, wonderful piece.

Posted 10 Years Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.




Reviews

liked this a lot

Posted 9 Years Ago


It is really a cause for concern….
But slimness has its own beaty….
Care should be taken…
Not to generate a distorted body image……that is the point….
A nice work indeed…


Posted 10 Years Ago


You have posted an amazing writing expressing everyones, and especially my views about the fashion industry. I agree a 100% with everything that you written here-well done for posting this :) I remember once my friend tried on jeans in BHS's Tammy and she fitted in size eight, and then she went to H&M and the only jeans that fitted her were size ten... *sigh*

I believe you got a rather high mark for this... Well done once again

Posted 10 Years Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.

I enjoyed your tone throughout this piece. It is refreshing to hear a young person speak with a clear point of view and not the typical mindless drivel that permeates much of the culture of youth. I applaud you on your depth of research and your sensitive and serious handling of a very real problem. I'm not at all certain I agree with the government forcing more laws upon us, I think we the public could handle this with our wallets and our voices, but I digress. Again, wonderful piece.

Posted 10 Years Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.

This is an interesting piece about a problem I didn't know anything about. It has been successful in making me aware of the issue so therefore I guess that makes it a good piece of writing. Obviously having to work to a word count always means some things get left out but I wonder if there was just enough space to mention that regarding the opinion of professional psychologists there's still no concensus over whether eating disorders are nature/nurture or a bit of both. Overall I think you've struck a good balance between informing the reader and also giving your opinion about the issue.

Posted 10 Years Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.


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658 Views
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Added on May 29, 2010
Last Updated on June 25, 2010
Tags: fashion, eating-disorders

Author

Tea And A Cheshire Smile
Tea And A Cheshire Smile

London, South-East England, United Kingdom



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NOTE: I'm hardly ever online on here now. I'm spending most of my time on my dA account, which is probably where I'll post my writing first. The link's on my profile. Feel free to add me on there too .. more..

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