The Concubine

The Concubine

A Poem by David Lewis Paget

Chen Xiao Fei while the sun does shine

Was taken as the Emperor’s concubine,

Just one of a hundred from the village Yang Ping

And chosen by the placing of a bright gold ring.

 

The Emperor’s minions took her by the hand

And led her far away from the life she’d planned,

Her tears flew wide as she said zy jian

To the Ma ma, signing her away with a pen.

 

She said farewell to her friends from the school

Then they bathed her well in a rose-petalled pool,

They dressed her in the silks of a young girl’s dream

And gave her to the Emperor, at just fourteen.

 

She lodged with the other of his concubines

Who taught her the rules she must follow all times

She never must climb in the top of his bed

But crawl beneath the sheet from his feet to his head.

 

She was told of the colours that she must not wear

And she came and she went, but by a side door

She was low in the rank of his concubines

And waited on him calling her, the very first time.

 

But once he had ravaged her virginity

She was told to leave his bed, but immediately,

For all of his consorts waited in a line

For the glory of a moment as his concubine.

 

They were guarded by the eunuchs of the Emperor’s court

Who dallied with the concubines, until they were caught,

Then their heads were toppled by a sharp steel blade

And buried in the field where their sisters were laid.

 

But the news came down, and the news was bleak

That the Emperor was dead, had died in his sleep

And the Empress ordered that Chen Xiao Fei

Would be buried standing up, in the Emperor’s grave.

 

She begged and she pleaded with the Emperor’s wife

But consorts were needed in the afterlife,

She could choose to be drowned in the well by the park,

Or hang herself there, with a bright silk scarf.

 

She picked out a scarf to be hung, Xiao Fei

Along with the others, at dawn the next day,

And they all were buried by the eunuch guard

In a line, in a field by the Palace’s yard.

 

And now as you pass by a field, weed-grown

There’s barely a glimpse of a weather-worn stone,

All that is left of the girl sent away

For the lust of an Emperor, Chen Xiao Fei.

 

David Lewis Paget

 

(Glossary:

Chen Xiao Fei - Chen Shao (ao as in ouch) Fay

Zy jian - zie jen (Goodbye)

Ma ma - Mar mar - (Mother))

© 2012 David Lewis Paget


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Sad isnt it that a man can be elevated to a god in the eyes of those who follow . Yet it is the truth of humanity. Imagine what we would do if we didnt have leaders we would all have to think for ourselves Perish the thought right lol. It is no different today when we see cult members kill themselves in a mass suicide

Posted 8 Years Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.




Reviews

Wow! The harsh reality is things similar to such still happen in many parts of the world. No greater motivation for corruption than Absolute Power. What a captivating Poem this is. I absolutely loved it.

Posted 8 Years Ago


2 of 2 people found this review constructive.

Sad isnt it that a man can be elevated to a god in the eyes of those who follow . Yet it is the truth of humanity. Imagine what we would do if we didnt have leaders we would all have to think for ourselves Perish the thought right lol. It is no different today when we see cult members kill themselves in a mass suicide

Posted 8 Years Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.

I really liked the rhythm of this one, like a drum beat.
Interesting tale!... :)

Posted 8 Years Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.

This is a poem unique to me, as i am currently living in China. Therefore, with the modern metropolis i live in currently, it's easy to overlook the rougher edges of China's history. Thanks for opening my eyes yet again :)

Posted 8 Years Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.

Your writings, your words never fail to astound me, your gift of storytelling is quite breathtaking. for i cannot think of anything else to say, once again, i am truly amazed. thanks for sharing. :)

Posted 8 Years Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.

David, this one must have come to mind from the time you lived in China. I know theEmperors back then were very selfish and the young girls had not chance but to obey..glad I was not alive at that time over there..lol aKathie

Posted 8 Years Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.

This is a grisly tale...poor Chen Xiao Fei won no glory in either life or death...
One hopes reincarnation is truth and she comes back as a princess...

Posted 8 Years Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.

Wow, very well-written.

Posted 8 Years Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.

You left the "Paget Line" here obviously, but you did not leave the reader wishing for anything. A complete story with the silent commentary speaking loader than a megaphone. The inhumanity and selfish distruction of the most precious gifts to our world. I found that I was having a much more emotional response to this than the tone of the poem would suggest. You have spun words into golden threads of truth here! I enjoyed the "easier" read with four lines and strong rhyming as well.
Thank you again Dave. I will greive for those who have been suffered thru human history as did our character "Chen Xiao Fei".
Be well.

Posted 8 Years Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.


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Added on November 7, 2012
Last Updated on November 7, 2012
Tags: silks, fourteen, Emperor, grave

Author

David Lewis Paget
David Lewis Paget

Moonta, South Australia, Australia



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