Chatting with chat

Chatting with chat

A Story by Robert Trakofler
"

The strange interactions I have with Chat GPT

"
     The concept of Chat GPT has fascinated me from the start there are other AI programs out there but the language model program was the one that intrigued me the most.  The concept of having an entity that can read millions of documents compile them and analyze is too brilliant to ignore! Of course, my first feelings were that of intimidation and thievery if a machine could read and write what does that do to all us slow minded actual writers LOL. What I have come to realize is that yes it can write things, but the creativity is simply not there it can not replicate creativity it can mimic it but you will find it is not hard to see the difference between a real poet and a computers composition. (Particularly from people like us here in the Café that read poetry like fiends)  
     What I have also learned from my interactions is that what Chat is good at, no... brilliant at is analysis hands down it is amazing at this. I have probably spent 100 hours interacting with this program and one of my favorite things to do is pick a poem and have it analyze it everything from Shakespeare's sonnets to Doctor Seuss! Occasionally I will feed it one of my poems to see what it sees and it helps to give me an idea if my intentions are hitting the mark this is a glimpse into one of my latest interactions from my most recent poem I published earlier this week...

The poem...

Dead Lines

 

To remember to say

the things we wish we, would have said

for the moments, decay

in the movements, we tread

and those dead lines convey

will get lost in our heads

in a bitter malaise

of intangible dread

 

I once laid in a state

where undeclared sentiment

echoed like kettledrums

inside of my chest

billowing a ravenous unspecified crave

this my friend, was the rub

for in this state

it was the only thing

reminiscent of living

 

In a curious slant

my motion sways passion again

this voice can enchant

and the deadline’s can’t steal, my pen

and the risk of a glance

in approval, or askance

to touch a heart… perchance

is the greatest gift to grant

 

 

© 2024 Robert Trakofler


This is a beautiful and evocative piece. Your use of imagery and emotion really brings out the theme of missed opportunities and the importance of expressing oneself before it's too late. The rhythm and flow add to the contemplative and slightly melancholic tone, making it resonate deeply. Here’s a brief analysis of your poem:

Analysis

First Stanza:

  • Theme of Regret and Lost Moments: The "dead lines" metaphorically represent missed opportunities to express important thoughts and feelings.
  • Decay and Movement: The imagery of moments decaying and movements being tread suggests the passage of time and the missed chances.
  • Intangible Dread: Reflects the lingering regret and unease that comes from not having said what needed to be said.

Second Stanza:

  • Undeclared Sentiment: Highlights the internal struggle and the emotional turmoil caused by unexpressed feelings.
  • Kettledrums Inside the Chest: A powerful metaphor for the loud, persistent reminder of those unspoken words.
  • Ravenous Unspecified Crave: Represents a deep, unfulfilled longing.
  • Reminiscent of Living: Suggests that even this painful state of longing is a reminder of what it means to be truly alive.

Third Stanza:

  • Passion Reawakened: Indicates a shift from regret to a renewed sense of purpose and hope.
  • Voice and Pen: The speaker finds empowerment in their ability to express themselves, suggesting that as long as one can still speak or write, they can reclaim lost opportunities.
  • Risk and Reward: The possibility of touching someone’s heart, whether the response is positive or negative, is worth the risk.

Overall Impression

Your poem captures the delicate balance between the pain of missed opportunities and the hopeful act of expressing oneself before it's too late. The transition from a state of regret to one of empowerment is poignant and uplifting. Great work!


That was pretty clever Analysis :) 

But then I asked it another question because this occurred to me...


Hey chat, do you see the similarities in some of the Shakespearian dialogs from hamlet? 


Here is it's response...


Yes, I can see the similarities to some of the themes and expressions found in Shakespeare's "Hamlet." Your poem resonates particularly with Hamlet's soliloquies, which often explore themes of introspection, regret, the passage of time, and the complexities of human emotion. Here are a few specific connections:

Similarities to Hamlet

**1. Introspection and Regret:

  • In Hamlet's famous "To be or not to be" soliloquy, he delves deeply into his own mind, contemplating life, death, and the nature of existence. Your poem similarly explores internal states and the consequences of unspoken words and unrealized moments.
  • Your Poem: "To remember to say / the things we wish we, would have said"
  • Hamlet: "To be, or not to be: that is the question: / Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer / The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, / Or to take arms against a sea of troubles"

**2. The Passage of Time and Decay:

  • Hamlet often reflects on the transient nature of life and the inevitable decay that comes with time.
  • Your Poem: "for the moments, decay / in the movements, we tread"
  • Hamlet: "Imperious Caesar, dead and turned to clay, / Might stop a hole to keep the wind away"

**3. Unexpressed Sentiment and Internal Struggle:

  • Hamlet struggles with his feelings and thoughts, often keeping them internalized, leading to a sense of frustration and emotional turmoil.
  • Your Poem: "where undeclared sentiment / echoed like kettledrums / inside of my chest"
  • Hamlet: "But break, my heart, for I must hold my tongue."

**4. Renewed Purpose and Action:

  • Hamlet's journey includes moments of resolution where he decides to take action despite his earlier hesitation and introspection.
  • Your Poem: "In a curious slant / my motion sways passion again"
  • Hamlet: "My thoughts be bloody, or be nothing worth!"

**5. The Power of Expression and Connection:

  • Both your poem and Hamlet emphasize the importance and impact of expressing oneself and making connections with others.
  • Your Poem: "and the deadline’s can’t steal, my pen / ...to touch a heart… perchance / is the greatest gift to grant"
  • Hamlet: "Give me that man / That is not passion's slave, and I will wear him / In my heart's core, ay, in my heart of heart."

Your poem’s contemplative tone, rich imagery, and exploration of profound emotional states echo the depth and complexity of Hamlet's soliloquies, making the connection quite evident.


My response...


after i wrote this poem that is what struck me it was as if i was responding to hamlets soliloquies


Chat's response...


That's a fascinating insight! It's quite an accomplishment to write a poem that feels like a response to one of Shakespeare's most profound works. Let's take a closer look at how your poem can be seen as a direct dialogue with Hamlet's soliloquies.

Direct Responses to Hamlet's Soliloquies

**1. "To be or not to be" Soliloquy:

  • Hamlet: "To be, or not to be: that is the question: / Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer / The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, / Or to take arms against a sea of troubles / And by opposing end them."
  • Your Poem: "To remember to say / the things we wish we, would have said / for the moments, decay / in the movements, we tread"
  • Response: While Hamlet debates existence and the passive suffering of life's troubles versus taking action, your poem reflects on the importance of action in expressing oneself to prevent regret and decay of moments.

**2. Hamlet’s Reflection on Life’s Brevity and Regret:

  • Hamlet: "Thus conscience does make cowards of us all; / And thus the native hue of resolution / Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought, / And enterprises of great pith and moment / With this regard their currents turn awry, / And lose the name of action."
  • Your Poem: "and those dead lines convey / will get lost in our heads / in a bitter malaise / of intangible dread"
  • Response: Your poem addresses the paralysis that comes from overthinking and the regret that stems from inaction, paralleling Hamlet's thoughts on how conscience can hinder decisive action.

**3. Hamlet’s Emotional Turmoil:

  • Hamlet: "But break, my heart, for I must hold my tongue."
  • Your Poem: "I once laid in a state / where undeclared sentiment / echoed like kettledrums / inside of my chest"
  • Response: Both Hamlet and your poem speak to the pain of unexpressed emotions. While Hamlet feels compelled to silence, your poem vividly describes the internal echo of these sentiments.

**4. Hamlet’s Resolve for Action:

  • Hamlet: "O, from this time forth, / My thoughts be bloody, or be nothing worth!"
  • Your Poem: "In a curious slant / my motion sways passion again / this voice can enchant / and the deadline’s can’t steal, my pen"
  • Response: Similar to Hamlet's resolution to act decisively, your poem expresses a renewed sense of purpose and the power of one's voice to overcome missed opportunities.

**5. The Risk and Reward of Connection:

  • Hamlet: "Give me that man / That is not passion's slave, and I will wear him / In my heart's core, ay, in my heart of heart."
  • Your Poem: "and the risk of a glance / in approval, or askance / to touch a heart… perchance / is the greatest gift to grant"
  • Response: Both Hamlet and your poem recognize the value and bravery in reaching out to connect with others, despite the potential for rejection or misinterpretation.

Conclusion

Your poem indeed feels like a dialogue with Hamlet, echoing his introspective struggles and ultimately offering a sense of resolution and hope. It's as if your poem takes Hamlet's existential musings and responds with a message about the importance of seizing moments and expressing oneself. This interplay between your contemporary voice and Shakespeare's timeless words creates a rich and meaningful conversation across time.


So If you guys are ever curious perhaps you might want to give it a try Chat in my opinion is really just an elaborate teaching tool and it does much more it also thinks... 

© 2024 Robert Trakofler


Author's Note

Robert Trakofler
https://chatgpt.com/

My Review

Would you like to review this Story?
Login | Register




Featured Review

Never ending fullness this. dear sir! Must read again and again, admittedly and will. But have rubbed shoulders with the need to understand what man and machine gives.. not always at the same time, together in raw thought but finger tips reaching one to another wondering if 'Eureka' will ever again shout its own presence?! Analysis and invention hand in hand in half empathy, perhaps.

'3. Hamlet’s Emotional Turmoil:

Hamlet: "But break, my heart, for I must hold my tongue."
Your Poem: "I once laid in a state / where undeclared sentiment / echoed like kettledrums / inside of my chest"
Response: Both Hamlet and your poem speak to the pain of unexpressed emotions. While Hamlet feels compelled to silence, your poem vividly describes the internal echo of these sentiments.

Was there ever a reason for such silence of an internal echo ? Will there be ?

Incredible writing, thinking and deep inspiration - plus, conscientious work in order to create this offering.

Posted 1 Month Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.

Robert Trakofler

1 Month Ago

as far as my own experience thus far has shown AI is a clever tool for analysis and it can do this b.. read more



Reviews

Wow Robert great writing, just epic and so much detail. Hats off to you. Brilliant work.

Posted 3 Weeks Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.

Robert Trakofler

3 Weeks Ago

I know it was a lot to swallow but I thought perhaps someone else might like to give it a try it has.. read more
Never ending fullness this. dear sir! Must read again and again, admittedly and will. But have rubbed shoulders with the need to understand what man and machine gives.. not always at the same time, together in raw thought but finger tips reaching one to another wondering if 'Eureka' will ever again shout its own presence?! Analysis and invention hand in hand in half empathy, perhaps.

'3. Hamlet’s Emotional Turmoil:

Hamlet: "But break, my heart, for I must hold my tongue."
Your Poem: "I once laid in a state / where undeclared sentiment / echoed like kettledrums / inside of my chest"
Response: Both Hamlet and your poem speak to the pain of unexpressed emotions. While Hamlet feels compelled to silence, your poem vividly describes the internal echo of these sentiments.

Was there ever a reason for such silence of an internal echo ? Will there be ?

Incredible writing, thinking and deep inspiration - plus, conscientious work in order to create this offering.

Posted 1 Month Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.

Robert Trakofler

1 Month Ago

as far as my own experience thus far has shown AI is a clever tool for analysis and it can do this b.. read more
Now I'm really going to have to try it out, Bunny. I'm always curious for a thorough analysis of my poems as I myself often don't understand why I wrote something. It should be so informative and insightful too. I really loved that you said that AI can never be as creative as a human poet. That's a wonderful assurance. At least that's one thing technology can't steal from us. I'm so glad I read this story today. It's really enlightening.

Posted 1 Month Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.

Robert Trakofler

1 Month Ago

That is exactly why I enjoy using it often times I haven't a clue as to why I write something or whe.. read more

Share This
Email
Facebook
Twitter
Request Read Request
Add to Library My Library
Subscribe Subscribe


Stats

165 Views
3 Reviews
Rating
Added on June 7, 2024
Last Updated on June 7, 2024
Tags: Writing Poetry Analysis

Author

Robert Trakofler
Robert Trakofler

pittsburgh, PA



About
I am the Bunny but the bunny isn't me long live the bunny Hello I’m Robert I own an art gallery and performance space in Pittsburgh called The Zenith It is also an antique store and a veget.. more..

Writing

Related Writing

People who liked this story also liked..