Spartacus

Spartacus

A Poem by Layla J Omorose

SPARTACUS

 

Do you see this warrior here?

The one with those hate filled eyes

A heart that mourns the life of a true love lost.

Let me spin the tale of this rebel leader

This man who gave a choice to those who had none.

Whose rage shook the very foundation of Rome… The Republic

 

Ripped from his arms was his heart

By a jealous general named Claudius Glaber

Raven black hair blew in the wind as he watched

Watched them take his life and toss it into the unknown world of soldiers hunger

Her tear stained face crystallized into his memory.

 

Thrown into the world of savage blood she

The green eyed Glaber watched

As he fought, fought to survive.

The dog of the sand where the crowd cheered with merciless glee for his defeat.

But he would not die that day… nor any one after it.

 

The dog, the mocked warrior, bared his teeth and sword

He showed the serpent general that he would not forfeit his hatred

Looking at the serpent, sword bloodied from his slain brethren

He promised revenge and death

Torment to the one who took his life.

 

He eluded death that day

Yet he did not know that the wheels of fate had been set in motion.

He would not know the Ludus that loomed before him

Would be the base of his epic journey.

That the gladiators… no, warriors that sneered at him

Kick dirt at his feet

Cursed his name

Would become those whom he trusted most.

 

There in that run down Ludus

That broken him with its demonic Dominus

And two sided Domina

Under the whip of a strong Doctore.

Given battle with the might Gaul

He would be crafted into the mightiest killing machine.

Blood and revenge would be all that guided him.

Revenge against the black hearted general who took his love form him

Death to the asters that finally extinguished his life.

The slave that had lifted the mighty House of Batiatus

Won the crowd, won the coin, but would claim the ultimate payment before all was said and done

The monster from the pits, the untrained dog…  Spartacus! Spartacus! Spartacus!

 

It would be through these serpents, these vipers that this warrior

Created by blood, given life by death, molded by tragedy, moved by vengeance

Would claim all that was rightfully his.

Through skill and wise words, treacherous actions of masters

He gained the Brotherhood that had marked his new life.

His most hated rival, through similar heartbeat, became his closest ally

Brothers in arms, soldiers following their general

Untied under one cause

When he roared his might,

Sought to pierce the skull of his diabolical master

Did fortune finally smile upon him.

 

The House of Batiatus

Made rich by the exploits of its favorite slave

Where lies and deceit, death and darkness were its foundation

Crumbled under the weight of his mighty vengeance.

Blood flowed that night

When the most prominent members of the world of Rome

Sought bloodshed and sport.

They received their blood… became their sport.

 

His rage fueled him

His hate raised his sword

His vengeance was the blade that cut through the neck of his master.

A master whose fate was to create the man

Whose life was extinguished by the legend.

Lies of the past, righted that night

Fate showed its hands.

Yet the three sisters were not done with him

For they spun their threads

Intertwined them with the lives of others

Merged fate to fate

 

For he would bring it all together

He would do their will

Free those who knew no freedom

Punish those who took without regard or regret

Feel for those who could no longer feel

Untie those who were divided

His fate was crafted with delicate fingers

Rome had yet to feel the wrath of the one

The dog

The slave

The man

The Legend

The God

 

Spartacus! Spartacus! Spartacus!

© 2012 Layla J Omorose


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Featured Review

You are great at this. I can see you doing a collection of period warriors stories. Maybe each one told through one of the three sisters of fate.

There is one line that did flow right in my mind. It might be just me but take a second look at it.
‘Revenge against the black hearted general who took his love form him’ Did you want from or formed instead of form?

Posted 7 Years Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.




Reviews

Good poem. Sets the story of Sparticus and his will to fight

Posted 2 Years Ago


Way cool but way long

Posted 7 Years Ago


Nice! You have depicted a Powerful man! Love this...written with conviction.. Spartacus is Hot!

Posted 7 Years Ago


You are great at this. I can see you doing a collection of period warriors stories. Maybe each one told through one of the three sisters of fate.

There is one line that did flow right in my mind. It might be just me but take a second look at it.
‘Revenge against the black hearted general who took his love form him’ Did you want from or formed instead of form?

Posted 7 Years Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.

I love this, especially the last stanza! Excellent writing!
Amazing in the imagery!

Posted 7 Years Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.

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AK
Oh my god! I loved this poem! It is utterly brilliant and desirably long too! Keep writing!

Posted 7 Years Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.

Nice!!

Posted 7 Years Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.

Sparticus a true hero of the oppressed. Lovely write.

Posted 7 Years Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.


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Added on May 19, 2012
Last Updated on May 19, 2012

Author

Layla J Omorose
Layla J Omorose

NY



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Wow, it has been a long time since I last posted on Writer's Cafe. Since my last update a lot of things have happened in my life, some good, some bad and I have been working on getting myself back tog.. more..

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