Why the Wind Blows

Why the Wind Blows

A Story by Micco Gibson
"

An attempt to get in touch with my Seminole culture through their storytellings of how things came to be.

"

The wind softly blew through the oak trees near the Seminole camp as the children played and the elders sat by the fire. The smell of wood burning, the sound of the children playing, and the dancing shadows cast by the warm fire invited Abiaka the elder to sleep, and he knew he would need his rest; the tribe would be leaving this site, known as the "Big Cypress Swamp", in the morning. As he was about to turn in for the night, when he noticed a young boy, Hollater, sitting beside him staring into the fire. Abiaka was surprised to see the boy sitting there instead of playing like the other children.

 

          "Elder Abiaka, can I ask you a question?" he asked. Abiaka smiled to himself.

 

          "Of course, young one, ask anything you would like. Is it perhaps about the Wars? Or maybe where we are heading?" A soft wind whisked over the fire, causing it to bend down, but only to come back slightly larger.

 

          "No, sir, actually I was wanting to know... Why does the wind blow?" The question took Abiaka slightly aback, not expecting this from a young boy. He sat for a minute, gathering his thoughts as the boy stared patiently into the fire. The elder started his story.

 

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       Back before the life of man, when the plants and animals were but newborns on this earth, a Spirit called Wind watched a young Bird in the nest from the time it was just an egg. In time the egg hatched into a baby Bird, and grew from the baby to a young child Bird just opening up to the world. Wind was so enchanted with the beautiful singing of the animals of the world, and it was the Bird's song Wind loved the most. Wind fell in love with the bird, and waited every morning for Bird to wake to hear his morning song, and waited every afternoon to hear his mid-day song, and waited into the evening to hear his late day song. This continued for many days and nights, and each day the songs became a bit more beautiful, and Bird a bit larger. One day, while waiting for Bird's morning performance, he spotted Bird on the edge of his nest, stretching his wings and looking to the sky. This confused Wind, as he did not know that Bird could fly, nor why he would want to. As Bird leaped off the nest and spread his wings wide, Wind felt panic. Bird was heading straight for the ground, he was too young to be able to fly. Quickly thinking, Wind flew beneath Bird and using his spirit, pushed Bird back up into his nest. Bird began to sing, but instead of a nice, happy tune, it was a sad, sorrowful performance. Wind listened, tired from his rescue, and spent the night there listening to the sad, slow vibrato of Bird's song.

 

       As Wind woke in the morning, he did not hear the Morning song. Looking up to the nest, he saw Bird looking to the sky again. Wind did not want Bird to leave, as Wind loved Bird so. Wind thought to himself, thinking that instead of keeping Bird in the nest as he wanted, he should let Bird go as she wished. Summoning up his strength, Wind pushed Bird up and off of the nest, and watched as Bird struggled to stay in the air. Bird started to drop steadily, not making and progress, and Wind decided to help a little bit more. Flying underneath Bird, Wind lifted Bird's wings and the two soared higher into the blue sky. Wind helped Bird fly over the Sparkling Lake and over the Green Forest, and with a giant last push, watched as Bird flew on her own out of sight singing her last song. Wind was sad for Bird's departure, but knew it was for the best. So powerful was that last push, that even after Wind stopped, that force is still helping Bird fly today. When Wind blows, the sound you hear is Wind singing Bird's departure songs, waiting for the day that Bird would return to him.

© 2010 Micco Gibson


Author's Note

Micco Gibson
This is based on how I think the old stories were told, although (regrettably) I've never heard one. I used the names Hollater and Abiaka, famous Seminoles in history. I'm proud of my connection, and even my name has deep roots in it. You may have heard of the indian Billy Bowlegs, and while he was chief, he was referred to as "Hollater-Micco" or "Chief Hollater". However don't feel like you shouldn't leave a review with criticism, it is still a writing, and I would enjoy feedback on it.

P.S. Will be adding more to it.... Eventually. :P

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Featured Review

This is BEAUTIFUL. I'm just going to quote my favorite lines here first:

"This confused Wind, as he did not know that Bird could fly, nor why he would want to." After I read this, I just kind of sat up and started thinking. It's a really good thought, and I'm sure it must have been a little difficult, thinking from Wind's perspective!

"Wind listened, tired from his rescue, and spent the night there listening to the sad, slow vibrato of Bird's song." This is my favorite sentence. The "sad slow vibrato", it's perfect imagery, it's heartbreakingly beautiful. You can hear it. I love it.


This is a great idea and a great story! It really captures my interest! I would love to hear more of the Seminole stories in your words!

Posted 10 Years Ago


2 of 2 people found this review constructive.




Reviews

Wow. This is really really cool. XD
I'm a sucker for folk lores and "campfire" stories.
But after Abiaka tells his story, there should a little bit more left.
Like how Hollater looks around to find the little bird or something of the other.

You should also include Hollater's thoughts before he questions Abiaka.
Like the feeling of the wind on his skin suddenly made him think.
And the mention of moving elsewhere is a bit out of the context, no?

Okies, grammar.

"the tribe would be leaving this site, known as the "Big Cypress Swamp" in the morning."
It should be, "known as the 'Big Cypress Swamp' (comma)".

"Bird flew on her own out of sight singing her last song.."
There are double full-stops in this, did you want an ellipsis?

Great Job, I'm looking forward to more of your writes XD

Posted 10 Years Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.

This is BEAUTIFUL. I'm just going to quote my favorite lines here first:

"This confused Wind, as he did not know that Bird could fly, nor why he would want to." After I read this, I just kind of sat up and started thinking. It's a really good thought, and I'm sure it must have been a little difficult, thinking from Wind's perspective!

"Wind listened, tired from his rescue, and spent the night there listening to the sad, slow vibrato of Bird's song." This is my favorite sentence. The "sad slow vibrato", it's perfect imagery, it's heartbreakingly beautiful. You can hear it. I love it.


This is a great idea and a great story! It really captures my interest! I would love to hear more of the Seminole stories in your words!

Posted 10 Years Ago


2 of 2 people found this review constructive.

I enjoyed this a lot. These kind of stories interest me, and you did an excellent job of telling it. Thank you.

Posted 10 Years Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.


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Added on January 11, 2010
Last Updated on January 14, 2010

Author

Micco Gibson
Micco Gibson

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About
Hey there, happy that someone is reading this. :) My name is Micco. I've always loved reading, and decided at a young age that I liked writing too. I could write long stories, but they didn't have a v.. more..

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