Haiku: original and translations

Haiku: original and translations

A Poem by Michael R. Burch

Ascendance Transcendence
by Michael R. Burch


Breaching the summit
I reach
the horizon’s last rays.

Sudden Shower
by Michael R. Burch


The day’s eyes were blue
until you appeared
and they wept at your beauty.

Imperfect Perfection
by Michael R. Burch


You're too perfect for words―
a problem for a poet.

yet another iffy coronavirus haiku #1
by michael r. burch


plagued by the Plague
i plague the goldfish
with my verse

yet another iffy coronavirus haiku #2
by michael r. burch


sunflowers
hang their heads
embarrassed by their coronas

I wrote this poem after having a sunflower arrangement delivered to my mother, who is in an assisted living center and can't have visitors due to the coronavirus pandemic.

homework: yet another iffy coronavirus haiku #3
by michael r. burch


dim bulb overhead,
my silent companion:
still imitating the noonday sun?

Stormfront
by Michael R. Burch


Our distance is frightening:
a distance like the abyss between heaven and earth
interrupted by bizarre and terrible lightning.

Splintering


An unbending tree
breaks easily.
―Lao Tzu, loose translation/interpretation by Michael R. Burch


Autumn Conundrum

by Michael R. Burch


It's not that every leaf must finally fall,
it's just that we can never catch them all.

Laughter's Cry
by Michael R. Burch


Because life is a mystery, we laugh
and do not know the half.

Because death is a mystery, we cry
when one is gone, our numbering thrown awry.

Childless
by Michael R. Burch


How can she bear her grief?
Mightier than Atlas, she shoulders the weight
of one fallen star.

New World Order
by Michael R. Burch


The days of the dandelions dawn...
soon man will be gone:
lawn fertilizer.

Translations


I entered the world empty-handed
and leave it barefoot.
My coming and going?
Two uncomplicated events
that became entangled.
Kozan Ichikyo (1283-1360), translation by Michael R. Burch

“Isn’t it time,”
the young bride asks,
“to light the lantern?”
Ochi Etsujin (1656-1739), translation by Michael R. Burch

Brittle cicada shell,
little did I know
you were my life!
Shuho (?-1767), translation by Michael R. Burch

Bury me beneath a wine barrel
in a bibber’s cellar:
with a little luck the keg will leak.
Moriya Senan (?-1838), translation by Michael R. Burch

Learn to accept the inevitable:
the fall willow
knows when to abandon its leaves.
Tanehiko (1782-1842), translation by Michael R. Burch

Darkness speaks
a bat in flight
flits through a thicket.
Masaoka Shiki (1867-1902), loose translation by Michael R. Burch

I’m tired,
so please be so kind as to swat the flies
softly.
Masaoka Shiki (1867-1902), loose translation by Michael R. Burch

Keywords/Tags: haiku, Japanese, translation, Oriental, imagery, metaphor, nature, coronavirus, plague, life, death, nature

© 2020 Michael R. Burch


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Added on July 9, 2020
Last Updated on July 9, 2020
Tags: haiku, Japanese, translation, Oriental, imagery, metaphor, nature, coronavirus, plague, life, death