That Was Monday

That Was Monday

A Poem by Marie Anzalone
"

Another devastating national tragedy. thoughts from an eerily similar location, 2 hours away. For the victims of the Fuego volcano, and every citizen who has stood up to help as the govt did not.

"

We knew. Two days

after the ash fell; and the rain

turned black over

1.7 million people. A million

and a half people going about

the daily things

that 1.5 million people

usually do here. Some shouting.

Some pushing. Some planting.

Much selling of ideas, time, things.

Shining of shoes already used

to carrying layers of fine ash.

 

It rains all the time, here.

We were in the dark that day.

Literally. We did not know

until they turned the lights back on

that afternoon. We were assured

it was not just 

a normal black rain day

when it made the international news.

 

Our city mobilized. We are maybe

not-so-good at prevention. Or

what you might call advance planning.

However, we are damned skilled

at responding. 200,000 people

rolled up their sleeves, and got

to work. 15 million more

across a continent did the same.

We sent our best to melt

their boots in hot mud and break 

our hearts anew with each 

picture they sent us. 

 

They asked us for food, so we sent

food, water, towels, blankets. They

asked for medicines. We sent

antibiotics, creams, bandages, washes.

We sent our blood. That was Monday.

They were still looking. They used words

like “rescue,” and “alive.” Emerge.

Recover. Hope.

 

Tuesday dawned with a haze

and a hushed silence that reached

even us. We knew then.

We knew by the words. By the requests.

They only wanted beds. 

Cots for the living.

Coffins for the rest. How many?

was the question we all had.

We still do not know.

We may never know.

Then they added dimensions

to the request. That was when

we broke. They were too small.

They were too heartbreakingly

damningly small. And they needed

way too many of them.

© 2018 Marie Anzalone


Author's Note

Marie Anzalone
June, 2018. The day the earth spilled into the sky and took hundreds or thousands of our people with it.

My Review

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Featured Review

'Coffins for the rest. How many? ~ was the question we all had. ~ We still do not know. ~ We may never know.~ Then they added dimensions ~ to the request. That was when ~ we broke. They were too small. ~
They were too heartbreakingly ~ damningly small. And they needed ~ way too many of them.#

And they'd have been part of the next generation. R., yes?

Amazing how much money is spent to fight wars but a country such as Guatemala has to beg for help from their so.called global neighbours.

I hope Writers Cafe members know they can donate to this or that RECOGNISED organisation to help towards this terrible tragedy: try local Red Cross or similar, your Churches, certain Banks, etc.

Your writing as always reaches out in its display of love and devotion to your neighbours over there. Please take care of yourself, dear R.

Posted 1 Year Ago


2 of 2 people found this review constructive.




Reviews

That was one hell of a Monday Dear Marie!!!! and Tuesday was heartbreaking very palpable poetry written in these lines...it is a shame that all to often it takes a tragedy to see the better angels of humanity bloom and often it is tempered by the despair of the moment captured in your lines

Posted 1 Month Ago


2 of 2 people found this review constructive.

That's awful that the government didn't step in to help during this time of tragedy. I can't imagine the fear that these people felt. I think it shows the best of humanity, when 200,000 people come together to help during a crisis. I found the last couple lines of your poem to be heart-wrenching. "They were too small, and they needed too many of them." Well written. I enjoyed reviewing your poem. Thanks for sharing.

Posted 1 Year Ago


2 of 2 people found this review constructive.

'Coffins for the rest. How many? ~ was the question we all had. ~ We still do not know. ~ We may never know.~ Then they added dimensions ~ to the request. That was when ~ we broke. They were too small. ~
They were too heartbreakingly ~ damningly small. And they needed ~ way too many of them.#

And they'd have been part of the next generation. R., yes?

Amazing how much money is spent to fight wars but a country such as Guatemala has to beg for help from their so.called global neighbours.

I hope Writers Cafe members know they can donate to this or that RECOGNISED organisation to help towards this terrible tragedy: try local Red Cross or similar, your Churches, certain Banks, etc.

Your writing as always reaches out in its display of love and devotion to your neighbours over there. Please take care of yourself, dear R.

Posted 1 Year Ago


2 of 2 people found this review constructive.

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This was so much better than watching news coverage of the events. Great deatail and vivid descriptions, thanks for sharing.

Posted 1 Year Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.

Marie Anzalone

1 Year Ago

Thanks, words. There is a huge difference between watching human tragedy occur, from a distance, and.. read more
so good to read you here, prayers for continuing relief efforts

Posted 1 Year Ago


2 of 2 people found this review constructive.

Marie Anzalone

1 Year Ago

thank you, Emily, for your kindness. Yes, we need the prayers. I saw an interview with a woman who l.. read more

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Added on June 7, 2018
Last Updated on June 10, 2018

Author

Marie Anzalone
Marie Anzalone

Quetzaltenango, Guatemala, CT, Guatemala



About
Bilingual (English and Spanish) poet, essayist, novelist, and technical writer working in Central America. "A poet's work is to name the unnameable, to point at frauds, to take sides, start argume.. more..

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