Grecian Urn II

Grecian Urn II

A Poem by Rick Puetter
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Meant to contrast and be more free form relative to my original "Grecian Urn"

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This is a faithful photographic reproduction of an original two-dimensional work of art.  The work of art itself is in the public domain for the following reason:  This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.   This applies to the United States, Australia, the European Union and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 70 years.

 


Grecian Urn II

 

Oh godly art, rare flower of antiquity

Please spill thy tale of heartless fate’s ubiquity

Of battles, deeds of Man, of Love--

And life’s fragility!

 

Oh, never have I deeply pondered fate before

But you inspire, and my spirit longs for more

With all your knowledge of the world

My aspirations soar!

 

Yet still I must confess I know you’re aught but clay

O’er history of Man I know you hold no sway

You are observer, nothing more--

Yet teach me, I do pray!

 

For oh, so many things you have seen in your time

The things you know, your knowledge quite o’erwhelms my rhyme

But you are silent on this theme--

Why must you play the mime?

 

Oh godly art, I honor you and wish you well

How long you still shall watch Mans deeds but time will tell

But on that fateful day

When thy molded clay

And artful form is felled

My tears shall fall to ground

As I shudder from that sound

And with grief my heart shall swell

 

Oh sad cracked art, lost flower of antiquity

I studied you and hoped to find congruity

With blind and savage twists of fate--

And life’s acridity

 

Yet I see you’re mortal, too

And in death make space for new

For more time you will not sue

Less pretentious than I knew

In your selflessness my hope for future dwells!

 

Oh godly art, rare flower of antiquity

Please spill thy tale of heartless fate’s ubiquity

Of battles, deeds of Man, of Love--

And life’s fragility!

 

 

 

©2010 Richard Puetter

All rights reserved

 

© 2012 Rick Puetter


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Featured Review

Rick,

This is exquisite poetry. You are a master of writing about precious antiquities, history and the past in vivid detail. Your poems are very special.....I adore them.

This no exception my dear friend. Very touching and balm to the senses; You are a master craftsman, know your subjects perfectly and thoroughly and wield your golden pen with panache and flair!

Bravo!

Kindest regards,

Helena :)



Posted 6 Years Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.




Reviews

Rick,

This is exquisite poetry. You are a master of writing about precious antiquities, history and the past in vivid detail. Your poems are very special.....I adore them.

This no exception my dear friend. Very touching and balm to the senses; You are a master craftsman, know your subjects perfectly and thoroughly and wield your golden pen with panache and flair!

Bravo!

Kindest regards,

Helena :)



Posted 6 Years Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.

Your poem is glorious and puts many lifetimes of thought into that urn. It's lioke what we wopuld want to know about the past but that urn is silent except for any obvious clues and even then we are left to guess at those stories
Love you rhymes, cleverly penned. Beautiful imagery too.

Posted 7 Years Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.

i must say that i am impressed. yours parallels that of john keats himself. as a matter of fact the original is my favorite of his poems. the language is just right, it's as plaintive as the first's narrator, the images are just as vivid. the metaphors or faithful. it makes me want to read keats then yours again. i really enjoyed reading this!

Posted 9 Years Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.

A much more evocative poem than Grecian Urn Part I. This is more plaintive, crying out the the urn with a deep thirst.

'You are observer, nothing more--'

What more does one need to be? For to be an observer and nothing else, is the highest state we can possibly attain!

'And in death make space for new
For more time you will not sue'

This alone is the Urn's true lesson. To be while you are to and to begone while you are done. To be an actor, who sings, croons, cries and laughs on stage but fades into darkness when the curtains fall.

A really good poem Rick.

Posted 10 Years Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.

Wow, both piece are truly a master piece...You have a gift. I agree with Legion...like the urn, we are each a work of art... very thought provoking and exquisitely written...

Posted 11 Years Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.

If asked which of your two "Grecian Urn" poems I favor, my answer would no doubt waiver. Both are precious works of art crafted by a master. While some may find this one to be less constrained, I tend to think in rhyme and meter and read between the lines so both speak to me. Both make me stop to think and appreciate the craftsmanship of the potter and of the poet. You have an enviable ability for writing equally well in diverse styles. Loved both versions!

Posted 11 Years Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.

Its really a great piece of writing…
As I told you earlier..not so many in our café chose topics for writing that need extensive research….. and intellectual query before writing a poem about it.,..
Well done rick…


Posted 11 Years Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.

I have read both I, II and enjoyed them immensely. I am quite familiar with Keats' poem but I have to be honest and say it is quite rare that I encounter an adaptation that surpasses the original. Your piece surpasses. I cannot add anything more worthy after reading what other reviewers have so graciously said. You have breathed life into ancient art with style and classicism.

Posted 11 Years Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.

"Grecian Urn II" is as lovely as the first, and I quite agree with Mark's assessment. That the urn comes from clay, so too does man, as such, we will all return to clay. The inanimate that witnesses so much and yet cannot speak. Your poem is as timeless as the urn itself, as lovely, and withstanding.

Linda Marie

Posted 11 Years Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.


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3727 Views
22 Reviews
Shelved in 2 Libraries
Added on July 23, 2010
Last Updated on June 18, 2012
Tags: reflection, art, history, relics, wisdom, life experience, meaning, purpose

Author

Rick Puetter
Rick Puetter

San Diego, CA



About
So what's the most important thing to say about myself? I guess the overarching aspect of my personality is that I am a scientist, an astrophysicist to be precise. Not that I am touting science.. more..

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