Damascus

Damascus

A Story by Ruth Carter
"

A dramatic monologue. Abigail is a fictional character in a biblical context.

"

 

Abigail:

 

Great and mighty God. I don’t know how to pray. I don’t know what to say. My thoughts are so confused. Dark fears and doubts press me down.

 

Already he has killed many followers of Jesus. I fear for my life and for my friends. We will be next. The fear has dimmed our hope. Shine your light on us, Jesus, give us rest from this persecution.

 

I must talk to you. Somehow I must express my mind and my heart. I know you know these already, but I don’t! I have to talk to you for my sake. Please excuse me if I do not pray with eloquence or learning. I am only a woman in a land where women count for little.

 

I don’t know how to pray! But pray I must. I must. I am so new to this. Praying was something men did, not women. Help me. Enlighten me. Give me the words. What’s that? I hear no voice, yet something is speaking to me. Pray my prayer? Pray my prayer? Whose prayer? Who is talking to me in a voice I cannot hear? Why am I so sure it’s important? How could I receive such a...It’s the Holy Spirit! Talking to--to--me! Pray my prayer, he says. Why, he must mean the prayer Jesus taught that day on the mountain. Joanna told me about it! I remember it. I’ll pray your prayer, Jesus!

 

Our Father-- My Father in heaven, your Name is to be praised above all others. Your kingdom come, your will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us today the bread we need. Give me, too, the courage and grace I need today. Forgive my sins as I forgive those who sin against me. Do not lead us into temptation but deliver us from the evil one. For the kingdom, the power and the glory are yours forever. Amen.

 

The kingdom is God’s? How can that be? This land isn’t God’s. The Romans own it, rule it. They and others before them have occupied it for centuries. It’s not God’s. We Jews can do nothing without our overlords’ permission. The great glories of David’s kingdom are gone forever. So how can the kingdom be God’s now? How can the kingdom be His, when it is Tiberius who reigns? And when we can be threatened by the Pharisee, Saul?

 

Wait. I remember the story of David. He built a great kingdom. It was Israel’s finest hour. What was that he said at the end of his life? "Yours, O Lord is the greatness and the power, the glory, victory and the majesty...Yours is the kingdom, O Lord."

 

The kingdom is yours, Lord. That was the king speaking. Does that mean Israel is God’s, no matter who is king? Whether it’s David or the Persians or the Assyrians, the Greeks or the Romans? The kingdom is the Lord’s and whoever reigns does so by His grace. Daniel even told Nebuchadnezzar that it was God who had given him kingdom, power, and strength and glory.

 

But there must be more. There must be! Is the kingdom limited to Israel? Is it an earthly, political thing of history only? No, it must be more than that. God is bigger than any dominion ruled by man. The kingdom is wherever He is! The kingdom is heaven where God reigns in glory. But it is also here in me because He is in me. Why, the psalmist said God inhabits my praise! My worship is His throne!

 

"All your works praise you, O Lord…They speak of the glory of your kingdom and talk of your power. They make known to the sons --and daughters--of men your mighty acts and the glorious majesty of your kingdom.

"Your kingdom is an everlasting kingdom and your dominion endures throughout all generations…

 

"…The Lord is righteous in all his ways and gracious in all his works. The Lord is near to all who call on him, to all of us who call on him in truth. He satisfies the desire of all who fear him. He hears our cry and he saves us."So. The kingdom, the power and the glory are yours, Lord. They are yours right here. Right here in this room as I wait for Saul to come. When I sing praises to you all of heaven rejoices with me. My adoration of you lifts me up and you fill me with your power and your glory. It is seen in me as I give it to you. The kingdom, the power and the glory are yours--yours--forever.

 

 

 

 

Amen, Lord, and thank you. I’m ready. When Saul arrives I’ll be ready. I’ll be ready, for your kingdom is here, right here in Damascus. Thank you, Jesus.

 

Suggested companion readings: Jude 24-25; Rev. 1:6; 4:8-11; 5:7-14; 7:9-12; 21:23-26

 

© 2010 Ruth Carter


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I found this a little hard to follow, had to read it a couple of times. I figured out one place that I might suggest could help clarify...second paragraph. "Already he has killed many followers of Jesus." He? who he? "Damascus" didn't help me because I was thinking of both Saul/Paul on the Damascus Road, and the Ethiopian on the Damascus road. Then for a moment I thought maybe this was spoken from the point of view of the guy who ended up giving Saul refuge on the street called Straight, but that was pretty quickly dissipated with "I am only a woman." I felt like I needed a little more info at the beginning. But I love the expression of faith and utter reliance on God and the transition into worship and readiness, the faith casting out fear and doubt, at the end.

Posted 9 Years Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.




Reviews

Response to Sara. Good comments! This is a dramatic monologue, singlet, whatever. Abigail is the character -- I put her name at the top, but I can see that a reader -- as opposed to an audience member -- could be confused as to the identity of the speaker! Hmmm. Was the Ethiopian really on the Damascus Road? I'll look it up.

Posted 9 Years Ago


I found this a little hard to follow, had to read it a couple of times. I figured out one place that I might suggest could help clarify...second paragraph. "Already he has killed many followers of Jesus." He? who he? "Damascus" didn't help me because I was thinking of both Saul/Paul on the Damascus Road, and the Ethiopian on the Damascus road. Then for a moment I thought maybe this was spoken from the point of view of the guy who ended up giving Saul refuge on the street called Straight, but that was pretty quickly dissipated with "I am only a woman." I felt like I needed a little more info at the beginning. But I love the expression of faith and utter reliance on God and the transition into worship and readiness, the faith casting out fear and doubt, at the end.

Posted 9 Years Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.


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Added on January 12, 2009
Last Updated on December 29, 2010

Author

Ruth Carter
Ruth Carter

Cottage Country, Ontario, Canada



About
Always a storyteller, whether it's writing, singing or acting! And, to quote Fanny Crosby, "I love to tell the story of Jesus and His love"! more..

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