Writing Emotobooks: A New Medium of Fiction : Forum : Genres and Ideas


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Genres and Ideas

9 Years Ago


Our maiden publication, Grit City, is a cross between mystery, thriller, and urban fantasy. It's gritty (hence its name) and dark. It's also full of action and suspense. The tension is necessary for the emotobook style, because it helps us accommodate the imagery (and it also helps the illustrators create the imagery!)

This might seem like a very specific chance for publication, but it's not. Most genres can be easily adapted into the emotobook style. Do you write YA Romance? It can be done. What about Science Fiction? That works, too. In fact, if you can come up with an interesting, well-written story, chances are it will work as an emotobook--- as long as it's not all "cotton candy laughter and rainbow dreams," as our publisher puts it.

Do you have an idea for something edgy? What about a novel or short story that you've already written? You don't have to post your writing, but please post your thoughts, ideas, and questions.
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Re: Genres and Ideas

9 Years Ago


The supernatural/paranormal/sci-fi/fantasy genres are all good fits for emotobooks. These genres are big hits in YA fiction, as well, which appeals to a large audience. If you can develop a good novel, you can develop a good emotobook. The difference is how you separate the main story arc into smaller segments, allowing for conflict and resolution in each issue.

So, if you think of it like a TV show season, it's simple. You'd want there to be a climactic point to the entire season, so if you look over the whole thing, you can easily spot the major conflict. But you'd need some of this adventure and tension in each episode, too, to keep your readers reading. Every issue does not need to end with a cliff-hanger, but something needs to happen. An issue can't float by without any tension, because we need a few high-tension scenes to insert illustrations.

There are endless ways to go about writing this way, and I'm not one to lecture on the writing process because it's different for everyone. These are a few suggestions, however:

Write each issue as a short story, but keep each short story centered around a common theme. Make sure you can link each story together to create a larger story (avoid inconsistencies and gaps in time that will confuse readers.)

Or:

Write out the novel, then separate it into ten smaller stories. If each issue doesn't have at least a few scenes of high tension, write them in afterward.

The great thing about emotobooks is that we can help you adapt your novel if it's already written. But, of course, as the emotobook trend grows, more writers will attempt this style from the beginning.
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Re: Genres and Ideas

9 Years Ago


Well put!  I would have to agree that is the basic format for sucessful entertainment. There has to be a good flow to the drama, with many ups and downs to the scenario.  People need to be able to relate on small levels and large levels. While keeping your writing independent and unique, attracting the readers can only be accomplished by stepping away from the spotlight and realising what can familiarise the reader with the story line and characters. With the emotobooks, alot of that familiarity can come from the art. The art will protray much of the feelings that are coming from the characters.  While I, for one, appreciate the value and exactness of words, the art can impress upon the viewer a better sense of feeing and dramatisation. For fact; Color is often used to describe feelings. And people naturally relate motion and action to state of being.   These emotobooks could be more of a literature revolution for the coming generations.

I will be very excited to see the issue of Grit City!
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Re: Genres and Ideas

9 Years Ago


The cool thing about the art is that it's expressionistic. It doesn't steal from the imagination, like an illustration of a scene or character would. As a reader, you still visualize everything your own way. The art just helps to shape how you respond to the tension. In my opinion, it makes the story more realistic.

The first four issues of Grit City are out now. The fifth will be released soon. You can find more information at the Emotobooks Page on my blog or the Grit City Website.