The Little Man

The Little Man

A Story by Joseph C. Grantson
"

Very short story with an intended longer meaning.

"
There was once a man who was walking. He was short, old, frail and all those other characteristics of weakness. He was covered in dirt and his clothes had many holes. But besides his great flaws he could walk, and so he kept walking; his face towards the earth and his mind at ease. He dragged an old cart behind him filled with many things covered underneath a rag. He walked for a long time until he came upon a town. At this town he decided he was going to stop and gather himself up before continuing his walking. Traveling through the town he noticed its people to be tall and strong in figure as well as good looking; they had wore pure clothing and their faces glowed with health. 
He eventually came upon 2 men in the midst of an argument over which of the 2 was stronger, better looking or had more money. When they saw the feeble little man walking in the direction they stopped him. The first man said "You there my small friend come here." Naturally the little man did and set his cart down, "I want you to tell this fool of a man right here that he is inferior to me." The second man replied saying "The only one inferior is you!" 
"Fine then perhaps we should settle this; show me all the wealth you have and we can see who is really superior" said the first man. And so the second man brought forward a great mound of valuables that towered over the little man. Then, the first man took out his valuables to present. "Obviously I have more wealth than you do!" said the second man. "You must be blind" said the first man, "clearly I have more than you do!" The second man then challenged the first man saying "Fine, if you truly are so foolish to believe that we have equal amounts of wealth, than we should have a fight to see who is more physically capable."
"I accept" said the first man, "and if you defeat me all my wealth is yours"
"And if you beat me you take my valuables" said the second man. They then both turned to the little man who had been silently observing the dispute and told him to be the mediator of the fight, and gave him their wealth until a victor was decided. And then the 2 men began to duel: kicking punching, and throwing themselves on the other without a sense of their wild state. They fought for a long time with no purpose. 
Eventually the first man lay on the ground beaten down until he was bloody and stopped moving. The second man stood equally as damaged, and wobbling, he began to walk over to the little man who had, again been standing silently observing the fight. The second man had almost reached his prize of wealth and superiority when he collapsed to the ground dead from his wounds.
The little man so inferior to all others, silently walked to his cart. Casting aside the old rag on top of it he revealed that inside it was filled with magnificent riches. He carried and added the 2 men's piles of fortunes to his cart; then covered it back up with the old rag. He gathered up his now far heavier cart and began to walk. The feeble, old, little man walked out of the town, and kept on walking.

© 2018 Joseph C. Grantson


Author's Note

Joseph C. Grantson
Very new writer. Looking for how to improve this or make it longer or anything.

My Review

Would you like to review this Story?
Login | Register




Featured Review

The Little Man
A Story by Joseph C. Grantson
" Very short story with an intended longer meaning. "
There was once a man who was walking. He was short, old,(and) frail. {and all those other characteristics of weakness.} He was covered in dirt, and his clothes had many holes. But besides his MANY flaws, he could walk,
[and ] so he kept walking, his face towards the earth and his mind at ease. He dragged an old cart behind him, filled with many things, covered {underneath} BY or WITH a rag. He walked [for a long time } OR until he came upon TO a town. At this town, OR there, he decided THAT he was going to stop and gather himself up(what does ''gather himself up'' mean? Is it like "gird his loins"?) before (he went on) continuing {his} walking. Traveling through the town, he noticed its people (to be) WERE tall,{and} strong, {in figure, as well as}and good-looking; they {had} wore pure clothing, and their faces glowed with health. {He} (E)eventually{, he} came upon 2(two) men in {the midst of} an argument over (about) which {of the 2} was stronger, better looking, or had more money. When they saw the feeble little man walking in their direction, they stopped him. The first man said, "You there, my small friend; come here."
Naturally, the little man did, and set his cart down.
"I want you to tell this fool {of a man} {right here] that he is inferior to me." (!)
The second man replied, saying, "The only one inferior is you!"
"Fine! Then perhaps we should settle this; show me all the wealth you have, and we can see who is really superior," said the first man.
So, the second man brought forward a great mound of valuables that towered over the little man. Then, the first man took out his valuables to present. "Obviously I have more wealth than you do!" said the second man. "You must be blind," said the first man, "Clearly I have more than you do!"
The second man then challenged the first man, saying, "Fine; if you truly are so foolish to believe that we have equal amounts of wealth, than we should have a fight to see who is more physically capable."
"I accept," said the first man, "And if you defeat me, all my wealth is yours."
"And if you beat me, you take my valuables," said the second man. They then both turned to the little man, who had been silently observing the dispute, and told him to be the mediator of the fight, gave him their wealth, until a victor was decided. And then the 2(two) men began to duel; kicking, punching, and each throwing himself upon the other, without a sense of their wild state. They fought for a long time, with no purpose.
Eventually, the first man lay upon the ground, beaten until he was bloody,not moving. The second man stood, equally
damaged and wobbling. He began walking over to the little man, who had, again, been standing silently, observing the fight. The second man had almost reached his prize of wealth and superiority, when he collapsed to the ground, dead from his wounds.
The little man, so inferior to all others, silently walked to his cart.
Casting aside the old rag on top of it, he revealed that, inside, it was filled with magnificent riches. He carried and added the two mens' piles of fortune to his cart; then covered it back up with the old rag. He gathered up his now far heavier cart and began to walk. The feeble, old, little man walked out of the town, and kept on walking.


Posted 3 Years Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.




Reviews

The Little Man
A Story by Joseph C. Grantson
" Very short story with an intended longer meaning. "
There was once a man who was walking. He was short, old,(and) frail. {and all those other characteristics of weakness.} He was covered in dirt, and his clothes had many holes. But besides his MANY flaws, he could walk,
[and ] so he kept walking, his face towards the earth and his mind at ease. He dragged an old cart behind him, filled with many things, covered {underneath} BY or WITH a rag. He walked [for a long time } OR until he came upon TO a town. At this town, OR there, he decided THAT he was going to stop and gather himself up(what does ''gather himself up'' mean? Is it like "gird his loins"?) before (he went on) continuing {his} walking. Traveling through the town, he noticed its people (to be) WERE tall,{and} strong, {in figure, as well as}and good-looking; they {had} wore pure clothing, and their faces glowed with health. {He} (E)eventually{, he} came upon 2(two) men in {the midst of} an argument over (about) which {of the 2} was stronger, better looking, or had more money. When they saw the feeble little man walking in their direction, they stopped him. The first man said, "You there, my small friend; come here."
Naturally, the little man did, and set his cart down.
"I want you to tell this fool {of a man} {right here] that he is inferior to me." (!)
The second man replied, saying, "The only one inferior is you!"
"Fine! Then perhaps we should settle this; show me all the wealth you have, and we can see who is really superior," said the first man.
So, the second man brought forward a great mound of valuables that towered over the little man. Then, the first man took out his valuables to present. "Obviously I have more wealth than you do!" said the second man. "You must be blind," said the first man, "Clearly I have more than you do!"
The second man then challenged the first man, saying, "Fine; if you truly are so foolish to believe that we have equal amounts of wealth, than we should have a fight to see who is more physically capable."
"I accept," said the first man, "And if you defeat me, all my wealth is yours."
"And if you beat me, you take my valuables," said the second man. They then both turned to the little man, who had been silently observing the dispute, and told him to be the mediator of the fight, gave him their wealth, until a victor was decided. And then the 2(two) men began to duel; kicking, punching, and each throwing himself upon the other, without a sense of their wild state. They fought for a long time, with no purpose.
Eventually, the first man lay upon the ground, beaten until he was bloody,not moving. The second man stood, equally
damaged and wobbling. He began walking over to the little man, who had, again, been standing silently, observing the fight. The second man had almost reached his prize of wealth and superiority, when he collapsed to the ground, dead from his wounds.
The little man, so inferior to all others, silently walked to his cart.
Casting aside the old rag on top of it, he revealed that, inside, it was filled with magnificent riches. He carried and added the two mens' piles of fortune to his cart; then covered it back up with the old rag. He gathered up his now far heavier cart and began to walk. The feeble, old, little man walked out of the town, and kept on walking.


Posted 3 Years Ago


1 of 1 people found this review constructive.


Request Read Request
Add to Library My Library
Subscribe Subscribe


Stats

87 Views
1 Review
Rating
Added on September 16, 2018
Last Updated on September 16, 2018
Tags: fiction, moral, theme, short story, story

Author

Joseph C. Grantson
Joseph C. Grantson

Raleigh, NC



About
I like to learn how to write better. more..