(What you'll expect) Introduction

(What you'll expect) Introduction

A Lesson by Plagued Monumentally
"

Not only will you learn a bit about my technique (and yours) but you'll find out what you will expect throughout this course. If you have any questions about this course, please mail me. I'm open to friend requests as well. But anyways --- let's get started, shall we?

"


What You Will Expect: An Introduction

***In order to see this picture below clearly, you might need to enhance/zoom your screen. Hold down the ctrl key while pressing the plus button (+) and keep pressing the plus button until it's big enough for you. If that doesn't work, then go to the tool option on the top left hand screen and zoom it until it fits your satisfaction. To go back to your original size hold down the ctrl key while pressing the minus button (subtraction button: -) and keep pressing the minus key until it's back to it's original size. If that doesn't work, do the aforementioned instructions with the tool option to reduce the size***

The numbers beside each picture is there to show the order of the comic.














Tired of finding courses online that cost money and/or are scams?
This course is 100% free and guaranteed to help. Scam free!

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Writing is such a complex topic to a wide variety of multifaceted and non-multifaceted writers. Some writers are more imaginative than others, and some are more informational. There are so many genres out there: fantasy, non-fiction, fiction, science fiction, historical fiction, romance, horror, supernatural, occult, erotica. Depending on what genre fits your interest, you might want to research it a little bit (if you don't know it very well).


Throughout this course you will learn: 

For novels/screenplays/scripts: 
- How to create unforgettable characters with a strong personality
- Plots that can make people think (if it interests you) 
- How to describe your characters (physical & mental traits) 
- Strong relationships among characters
- Describing scenery
- Finding your type of writing style
- Working on strong titles/symbols throughout the story

For poetry: 
- Good imaginary/allusion
- Format
- Allegory building
- Write your own poem: test run


TIPS: 

- Start by broadening your vocabulary.
If you already have an outstanding one where you know more of the English language than your English teacher; bravo. If you're like me and the idea of learning new words excites you, then start by reading a University book and write down all the words that you're unsure of. If that seems extremely boring, try reading some poetry on here and writing down words that you're unsure of as well. If you hate the thought of learning new words and it makes you bored really easily then have some fun with it. Google: "really intelligent words to become smarter than everyone around you" or something like that. Google is there for a reason.

- If you're art obsessed or have a general interest in it (or get inspiration from it easily) then use that in your writing.
You can be surprised how well you can paint a picture with words. Getting an artistic view of the scene you're trying to write; use it with art techniques. Not only are you combining two interests to make it all the more interesting, but you're making it relatable for other aspiring artists.

- Write somewhere that's isolated so you won't get distracted.
You have no idea how nice it is to bring your laptop or a pen and a piece of paper and go write somewhere. Down by the river valley, at an isolated park, on a bench somewhere, at the mall if you're writing about something including that, or just anywhere where you get your inspiration from.


Any questions, comments, or need more extra advice; feel free to mail me.


Comments

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Posted 4 Years Ago


Dracula is a published poet, but trying to learn how to write short stories. He hopes this helps him.

Your favourite monster,
Dracula

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Posted 4 Years Ago


Brilliant!

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Posted 4 Years Ago


Three resources I use constantly: Google, dictionary.com, thesaurus.com

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Posted 4 Years Ago


I keep a dictonary/thesarus on my desk. It has the thesarus on the bottom 3rd of the page(Webster's New World 1996). I can look up a certain word and see other words I could use instead. That helps me learn to 1) rely less on spellcheck which is very distracting and 2) "Paint" the picture of my story with words that mean the same but are different shades of the same color in a way. Since I'm fairly new at formally writing it helps alot and I should probably update that thing...ha,ha

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Posted 4 Years Ago


Can't Wait To Read More!
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Want to advertise here? Get started for as little as $5

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Posted 4 Years Ago


I'm ready to learn! Bring it on! :)

-Dell

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Posted 5 Years Ago


Just subscribed. What's next?

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Posted 5 Years Ago


Suscribed...Looking forward to this course. thnx in advance

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Posted 5 Years Ago


Subscribed, this will definitely be a great help.

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Posted 5 Years Ago


This seems like it will be a huge help for everyone who reads it!

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Added on January 2, 2012
Last Updated on January 2, 2012
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Plagued Monumentally
Plagued Monumentally

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About
So it's been a couple years since I've been on this site, and lots has changed. Most of my writing is between two to three years difference to the stuff I'm writing now. Please pay attention to the di..